Repo Dorks

Here’s a handy list of Google Dorks for use when searching through (github) source code repositories to find sensitive data

  • SSH hosts and keys:
    site:github.com inurl:“known_hosts”“ssh-rsa”
  • Private encryption keys:
    site:github.com inurl:“id_rsa” -inurl:“pub”
  • Test configuration info:
    site:github.com inurl:“test” filetype:config
  • Ruby on Rails secure token:
    site:github.com inurl:secret_token.rb
  • Windows Azure account keys:
    site:github.com “;AccountKey=”filetype:config
  • Database connection config:
    site:github.com “;User Id=” filetype:config
  • Amazon Web Service access key (Java):
    site:github.com “AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID” filetype:properties
  • Amazon Web Service access key (Other):
    site:github.com “AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID” filetype:config
  • Bash command history:
    site:github.com filetype:bash_history
  • Account config data:
    site:github.com filetype:xml inurl:accounts.xml
  • SQL containing passwords:
    site:github.com filetype:sql where password
  • Django settings file:
    site:github.com inurl:settings.py

DROWNing in bad crypto

If you are still running SSL to “protect” your website at all, you need to shut it off. Yes, really.

If you have some kind of load balancer in front of your server, disable SSL on that also.

Using SSL on a mailserver? Kill it there too.

SSL is seriously broken (see: CRIME, BEAST, BREACH, FREAK, and now DROWN). It does not protect data, though it may appear to.

If you want to keep data safe configure your system to use TLS only, enable HSTS, and accept only strong cipher suites. Sound complicated? It’s really not.

Here are some configuration examples to get you rolling.

TL;DR:

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how do you become a hacker?

I sometimes get asked how one can develop the skills needed to do what I do for a living. This is a tricky thing to answer, because being a good hacker ultimately means you think “wrong”, not just that you understand tech.

When I interview people for a job, of course I’m looking to see if you have technical chops. More importantly though, I’m looking to see how you think, and how you handle unexpected things.

That “hacker mindset” quality is hard to define, tough to extract over the course of a brief interview, and impossible to teach. We can bring people up to speed in tech stuff, business stuff, project management stuff, etc., but thinking crooked, that’s not really a teachable skill; you either do it, or you don’t.

All that said, understanding tech is definitely a requirement, and fortunately there are tons of ways to gain skills in this (one fantastic resource for this is the book “The Web Application Hackers Handbook” written by PortSwigger).

There are a bunch of resources online as well, (free in most cases), so I threw together a small list of some quality sites that teach tech/hacking:

Programming

Basics of Computing

Hacking

Crypto

This list is obviously not exhaustive, or even complete really, but hopefully it’s useful to someone.

Another recommendation I would make to anyone looking to get into this field, is definitely get to a hacker con – specifically one like BSides. These are pretty much everywhere at this point, and are very good for learning new things and getting a feel for what hacker culture is like.